STOPPING THIS HABIT AT OFFICE IS GOOD FOR YOUR HEALTH

ARE VARICOSE VEINS AND SPIDER VEINS A SIGN OF HEALTH PROBLEMS?

The relationship between varicose veins and spider veins and major health problems is not completely clear.

  • A varicose vein begins to bleed.
  • A varicose vein becomes swollen and warm to the touch.
  • The color of the varicose vein changes to red.
  • You experience rashes, color changes, or thickening near the ankles.

HOW CAN YOU PREVENT CARDIOVASCULAR PROBLEMS, SUCH AS VARICOSE VEINS?

As we mentioned before, age is a contributing factor for cardiovascular problems, such as varicose veins. Genetics can also play a role. We can’t stop the aging process or change our genes (at least not yet). But we can address some of the other contributing factors.

  • Minimize Sun Exposure: if you’re fair skinned, use sunscreen or avoid the sun to prevent spider veins, especially on the face.
  • Pregnancy and Hormonal Changes: Pregnant women sometimes experience temporary varicose veins during their pregnancy. Women on HRT may experience an increased incidence of varicose or spider veins.
  • Control Your Weight: Maintaining a healthy weight can decrease the pressure on your veins.
  • Eat a Low Sodium, High Fiber Diet: Reducing salt can reduce swelling while high-fiber foods help reduce constipation, both of which are associated with varicose veins.
  • Avoid Sedentary Lifestyle at Work or at Home: Avoid standing or sitting for long periods of time. Using a Formaspace Sit-to-Stand desk can make this easy to accomplish during the day. Be sure to get up and walk at least every 30 minutes. Avoid crossing legs for extended periods of time, which can restrict blood flow. Choose low shoes over wearing high-heels to increase the movement of blood through calf muscles.

START AN EXERCISE PROGRAM TO IMPROVE YOUR CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH

Whether you are younger or older, in good health, or are experiencing an ongoing health issue or disability, regular exercise and physical activity will help improve your long-term cardiovascular health.

STEPS TO TAKE BEFORE STARTING AN EXERCISE PROGRAM

If you have not been physically active for some time, you should schedule a physical and a consultation with your physician prior to beginning an exercise program to identify any special concerns or risks.

  • Identification of specific exercise goals that are appropriate for your present physical condition
  • Recommendations concerning any of your personal health concerns (such as high blood pressure or medications you are currently taking)
  • Ways for diabetics to manage their blood sugar when exercising
  • Advice on exercise during periods of rehabilitation or recovery from surgery or other major health events (such as a heart attack)
  • Safety tips to prevent re-occurrence of past injuries
  • Evaluation of bone density, especially for women over 65 who are at special risk for osteoporosis
  • Review of when to call 911 emergency services if you experience any unexplained symptoms during vigorous exercise (e.g., chest pain or pressure, pain in your joints, dizziness, or excessive shortness of breath)

DEVELOPING YOUR OWN PERSONAL EXERCISE PROGRAM

For many individuals, the start of a successful exercise program begins with a diary that logs your current physical activities. Knowing your current habits will make it easier to set new, achievable goals — for today, tomorrow, this week, this year and next year.

FOUR COMPONENTS OF A BALANCED EXERCISE PROGRAM

1. IMPROVING YOUR FLEXIBILITY

Stretching or flexibility exercises are an important part of your physical activity program.

  • A mild, uncomfortable, “pulling” sensation when stretching is OK. However, if you feel a sharp or stabbing pain, or pain in your joints (either right away or even the next day), you are stretching too much.
  • Avoid “bouncing” or jerking into position when stretching; this can cause muscles to tighten, possibly leading to an injury. Use slow, steady movements instead.
  • Avoid “locking” your joints into a fully straight position; keep your joints slightly bent while stretching.

2. BUILDING UP ENDURANCE

If you are new to participating in an exercise program, try to build up to at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity activity each day of the week. The exact amount of time recommended will depend on your current level of physical conditioning.

3. INCREASING YOUR STRENGTH

Weight-bearing exercise (also known as strength training) is recommended for everyone. Women age 65 and older and/or those diagnosed with osteoporosis will especially benefit from lifting weights.

  • Take 3 seconds to lift or push a weight into place, hold it in position for 1 second, and take another 3 seconds to return to your starting position. Don’t let the weight drop; returning it slowly is very important.
  • Try to do 10 to 15 repetitions of each exercise. Think of this as a goal. If you can’t do that many at first, do as many as you can. You may be able to build up to this goal over time.

4. MAINTAINING YOUR BALANCE

Each year, more than 2 million older Americans have fall-related injuries that require a visit to the emergency room.

--

--

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store